Provost Williams C of E Primary School

Value, nurture, protect and challenge.

Sodens Avenue, Ryton-On-Dunsmore, Warwickshire CV8 3FF

02476 302166

admin3212@welearn365.com

Safeguarding

Safeguarding
Under the Education Act 2002 (Section 175), schools must make arrangements to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. Parent/carers should know that the law (Children Act 1989) requires all school staff to pass on information which gives rise to a concern about a child’s welfare, including risk from neglect, physical, emotional or sexual abuse. The staff will seek, in general, to discuss any concerns with the parent/carer, and where possible, seek their consent to a referral to Social Care. This will only be done where such discussion will not place the child at increased risk of significant harm. Schools will seek advice from Social Care when they have reasonable cause to suspect a child may be suffering or likely to suffer significant harm. Occasionally, concerns are passed on which are later shown to be unfounded. Parents/carers will appreciate that the designated person for child protection was carrying out their responsibilities in accordance with the law and acting in the best interests of all children.

SAFEGUARDING TRAINING

All schools receive safeguarding training. In 2016 our training has consisted of the following;

  • PREVENT training led by Warwickshire Police and the LA. This training is aimed at protecting children from radicalisation and other similar forms of harm and abuse
  • Whole staff training on CHILD PROTECTION (CP). This consists of;
  • Making staff aware of who children might be at risk of
  • Signs and symptoms that staff might see that could indicate abuse
  • What to do if a child says that they are being harmed
  • What to do if they thought a colleague was putting a child or themselves at risk
  • How to promote safeguarding in the curriculum
  • The Governing Body have received CP training from the LA’s Governor Training Service
  • VOLUNTARY HELPERS have received in-house training on Signs and Symptoms and How to Respond to a Disclosure
  • DESIGNATED LEADS are Claire Hall, Davina Lambeth and Jayne Johnson in the ARK
  • Printed reminders of HOW TO RESPOND TO A DISCLOSURE are in every teachers desk

 

THE CHILDREN

 There is nothing more important than the safety of our children

 

As we all know the subject is extremely emotive. For example how much do we/should we tell children if they ask direct questions on personal issues or issues relating to the news, how do we get the balance between informing and scaring and how do we address the misconceptions of stranger danger?  

In school we do regular safety assemblies. We may discuss a whole range of scenarios asking the children what they would do in that situation. We also discuss situations that can happen in a school, for example if a child is not picked up, if someone they do not know tries to get into school etc.  

We think that it is important that children are made aware of some of these issues and that these issues are discussed in the safety and security of the school setting. We also feel that it is important that they know some strategies to help, know that it isn't their fault, know that they must tell someone and who that someone may be.  

We do emphasise to the children that these situations are very rare.    

Part of our curriculum is teaching Protective Behaviours.  This is a county wide initiative designed to help prevent abuse and harm to children.  

There are two themes to Protective Behaviours:

i.We all have the right to feel and be safe at all times

ii.We can talk to someone about anything, even if it's awful or seems insignificant  

The teaching material is age appropriate  

Protective Behaviours is in the following sections  

i. Safe language – This is deals with the impact that the language we use impacts on others.  It asks children  to think if there language helps or "puts down" others and are the words they are using offending others

 

ii. Safe Feelings – This discusses where children might feel safe and what it means to be safe

 

iii. Fun to Feel Scared – There are times when we enjoy being scared.  Occasionally getting "out of the comfort zone" and feeling challenged and the resulting exhilaration is good for us

 

iv.Early Warning Signs – Sometimes our body tells us that we are not safe and we discuss what these signs are and how to recognise these and the importance of "listening to our bodies".  This may be the signal for us seek help

 

v. Networks – We emphasise that there is nothing so awful we can't talk about it. Having a "network", a group of people that we choose for ourselves can help.  Children are encouraged to always tell an adult in their network about secrets if they have Early Warning Signs about them.  We encourage children to tell, tell and tell again until the Early Warning Signs go away

vi. Body Privacy – We encourage the use of correct names for "private body parts". We feel that this reduces the risk that issues are not lost through misunderstanding. The key message given to the children is that their body is private and if they don't not feel comfortable with touching they should share this with an adult in their network

vii. A Few Things to Remember:

 

All of our children have a right to feel safe, we need to reinforce this message

We are all responsible for respecting other people's right to feel safe

Do not teach children not to speak to strangers or that strangers are dangerous, they are sometimes the only person who can help. We teach our children about safe strangers, eg if lost find a shop assistant, a mum with children etc.

Assemblies

In school we do regular safety assemblies. We may discuss a whole range of scenarios asking the children what they would do in that situation. We also discuss situations that can happen in a school, for example if a child is not picked up, if someone they do not know tries to get into school etc.
 
We think that it is important that children are made aware of some of these issues and that these issues are discussed in the safety and security of the school setting. We also feel that it is important that they know some strategies to help, know that it isn't their fault, know that they must tell someone and who that someone may be.
 
We do emphasise to the children that these situations are very rare.